David Rhodes: Nocturnes, Some Walls, Oakland, CA

David Rhodes, Some Walls

Some Walls is pleased to present David Rhodes: "Nocturnes," paintings on linen and paper by the British-born, Berlin-based artist from January 19 - March 31, 2013. This is a unique opportunity to see Rhodes's work in the San Francisco Bay Area.

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Did You See Heaven: SPECTRA, Peregrine Program, Chicago, IL

Li Trincere, Peregrine Program

In a conversation with the artist Mary Heilmann at the Art Institute's Modern Wing a while back, she asked "Did you see Heaven?" in reference to her brushy green painting (titled Heaven) then on exhibit. I remember so well the way she mischievously smiled that question. With big eyes. It still makes me smile.

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Fernando Mastrangelo: Black Sculpture, Charest-Weinberg, Miami, FL

fernando mastrangelo_charest weinberg

For “Black Sculpture,” Mastrangelo focuses on art history for the first time. After creating exact molds based on the work of Frank Stella and Ad Reinhardt, Mastrangelo casts his reliefs out of compacted gunpowder. The pieces teeter on the precipice of annihilation; by forging the work of canonical artists in gunpowder, Mastrangelo simultaneously pays homage to the work of earlier iconoclasts and seeks to destroy them for himself.

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de Kooning: A Retrospective, Museum of Modern Art, New York, NY

moma- de kooning

This is the first major museum exhibition devoted to the full scope of the career of Willem de Kooning, widely considered to be among the most important and prolific artists of the 20th century. The exhibition, which will only be seen at MoMA, presents an unparalleled opportunity to study the artist’s development over nearly seven decades, beginning with his early academic works, made in Holland before he moved to the United States in 1926, and concluding with his final, sparely abstract paintings of the late 1980s.

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Making Histories: Changing Views of the Collection, Temporary Stedelijk 2, Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam, The Netherlands

flavin-stedelikjk

Installation view. Opens March 3, 2011 Making Histories: Changing Views of the Collection explores how a museum collection constructs and embodies histories to be reconsidered over time, offering various views into the museum’s own history and its collections right up to the present day, through monographic installations of individual works or bodies of work by key artists and designers, thematic surveys, archival research projects, special projects and recent acquisitions. The exhibition showcases the breadth of […]

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Becoming Modern in America: Life Magazine 1936-1972 & New Paintings by Loren Munk

Detail of Life Magazine, August 8, 1949

December 11, 2010 - January 29, 2011

MINUS SPACE is pleased to announce the exhibition Becoming Modern in America. The twofold exhibition will feature more than 20 vintage issues of Life magazine spanning the years 1936-1972, as well as two recent paintings by Brooklyn, New York-based painter Loren Munk.

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Artists at Max’s Kansas City, 1965-1974: Hetero-Holics and Some Women Too, Loretta Howard Gallery, New York, NY

lorettahoward-maxs

Installation view September 10 – October 30, 2010 As the Cedar Tavern played a role in the formation of abstract expressionism, Max’s Kansas City galvanized a younger generation of artists from when it opened in 1965 to when it closed its doors in 1974. This exhibition will feature the amazing diversity of artists from every major reference point in the New York art world of the period: Abstract Expressionism, Color Field, Pop Art, Minimalism, Conceptual […]

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Arshile Gorky: A Retrospective, Philadelphia Museum of Art, Philadelphia, PA

philadelphia-gorky

Arshile Gorky, Agony, c. 1947 October 21, 2009 – January 10, 2010 The Philadelphia Museum of Art will present a major traveling retrospective celebrating the extraordinary life and work of Arshile Gorky (American, born Armenia, c.1904-1948), a seminal figure in the movement towards gestural abstraction that would transform American art in the years after World War II. The first comprehensive survey of the work of this artist in nearly three decades, Arshile Gorky: A Retrospective […]

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Easy Pieces: Interview with Richard van der Aa, by Brent Hallard, Visual Discrepancies blog, September 15, 2009

visualdiscrepancies-vanderaa

Brent: Finding. You come out of a bit of a painting history; gesture; hints of constructive; a kind of record keeping; painting that pays attention to relationship more than heroics, though the mark and scale suggests that’s where you were initially coming from? Richard: Yes, I do feel that what I do comes out of, and actually continues within, a history of painting. I trained as a painter initially during the early 80s in Christchurch, […]

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Tranquil Power: The Art of Perle Fine, Hofstra University Museum, Hempstead, NY

hofstramuseum-fine

  Pearl Fine, Unequivocably Blue, 1967 April 7 – June 26, 2009 Perle Fine (1905-1988) was one of the few women artists in the inner circle of the Abstract Expressionism movement. She moved from Boston to New York in the late 1920s to study art. Kimon Nicolaides was her mentor at The Art Students League. By the late 1930s, she attended Hans Hofmann’s studio sessions. Fine soon became an active member of the New York […]

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Interview with Michael Brennan, by Jacob Gossett, Kollektiv magazine, 2009

kollektiv-brennan

  Michael Brennan: Knife Paintings MINUS SPACE project space, Brooklyn, 2006 Skeleton Star, Knife Painting #3 (left) Bishop, Knife Painting #2 (right)   Jacob Gossett: How long have you been teaching here at Pratt and what brought you to this school?   Michael Brennan: I’ve been teaching here for 10 years—I went here for MFA from ’90 to 92. I was out of Pratt for several years, showing some and doing a lot of writing […]

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Brandeis University to Close Rose Art Museum and Sell Off Its Collection

roseartmuseum

    “The Rose Art Museum on the Brandeis campus houses what is widely recognized as the finest collection of modern and contemporary art in New England. With more than 6,000 objects — paintings, sculptures, works on paper and new media — the Rose collection has particular strengths in American Modernism, American Social Realism, post-War American, Abstract Expressionism, Minimalism, Surrealism and Photorealism. Recent acquisitions include works by Nam June Paik, Anri Sala, William Kentridge, Thomas […]

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Max Gimblett: The Midnight Sun, Haines Gallery, San Francisco, CA

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  Max Gimblett, Figure of Eight, 1999 15 inch quatrefoil January 8 – February 28, 2009 Max Gimblett’s ninth solo exhibition, The Midnight Sun, at Haines Gallery includes recent paintings of the visual and intellectual cross-cultural complexity that has been the hallmark of his work for decades. In the new double squares and quatrefoils, Gimblett uses patinas of epoxy and polyurethane, layers of gesso, acrylic and vinyl polymers, and surfaces of black and white and iridescent silver and gold, united by […]

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Sydney Ball: In Light of Colour, Sullivan+Strumpf, Sydney, Australia

  September 9-28, 2008 In 2007 Sydney Ball revisited the direct pictorial architecture of his Canto paintings to develop Structures 2, a series of radiant abstract colour works. The modernist architecture of Mies Van Der Rohe and Zaha Hadid – and their open-ended, problem-solving approach to refined ‘architectonic form’ – provided a framework that resonated with Ball’s artistic practice.  As a young man, Ball worked as an architectural draughtsman before moving to New York in […]

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Action/Abstraction: Pollock, de Kooning, and American Art, 1940-1976, The Jewish Museum, New York, NY

  May 4 — September 21, 2008 In Action/Abstraction: Pollock, de Kooning, and American Art, 1940-1976, the first major U.S. exhibition in 20 years to rethink Abstract Expressionism and the movements that followed, over fifty key works by 32 artists – among them Jackson Pollock, Willem de Kooning, Helen Frankenthaler, Mark Rothko – will be viewed from the perspectives of influential, rival art critics Clement Greenberg and Harold Rosenberg, the artists, and popular culture.

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Jack Tworkov: The Late Paintings, Acme Fine Art, Boston, MA

  Jack Tworkov, Q1 75 #3, 1975  Oil on canvas, 72 x 72 inches March 28 — May 3, 2008 ACME Fine Art presents an exhibition of important oil paintings by one of New York School’s most distinguished practitioners, Jack Tworkov. The exhibition will feature paintings from the final 15 years of Tworkov’s distinguished career. Jack Tworkov was born on the cusp of the twentieth century in Biala, Poland, emigrated to the United States in […]

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Small Differences Make All the Difference, by Lynne Harlow

In his series of lectures, Pictures of Nothing: Abstract Art since Pollock, Kirk Varnedoe asks tough questions.  Why abstract art?  What is abstract art good for?  These questions, the topic of his six lectures, are familiar.  It seems to me that they are asked, and in a sense answered, every time an artist makes an abstract work.  They are the questions that artists ask as we wrestle with the history of abstraction and as we […]

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Ward Jackson: Heat at the Edges, A Conversation with Julian Jackson & Matthew Deleget

Ward Jackson at Kay-Mar Gallery, NY, 1964 Transit & Garden 1 (left to right)   Quite simply, you have to know about Ward Jackson and his work — he was an innovative abstract painter, a maverick editor and arts worker, and a key member of New York City’s abstract artist community.  I recently had the pleasure of speaking with Ward’s nephew, artist Julian Jackson, about his uncle’s life and work.  Our discussion that follows is […]

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Interview with Douglas Witmer, by Chris Ashley

introduction Douglas Witmer makes paintings with a purpose.  I mean this in two ways — he makes paintings purposefully, and his paintings have a purpose.  This is not to say in the least that his paintings are predetermined and strictly didactic.  Despite their apparently structured appearance they are expressive rather than merely planned and executed, and porous rather than closed in meaning. Witmer’s varied and improvised use of color, surface, form, and material is surprisingly […]

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Sharon Brant interview with Chris Ashley

  introduction Sharon Brant’s paintings and drawings embody a consistency of vision and persistence. Her work is the result of a long commitment to abstraction; it is structured and perceptual, human and beautiful, quiet and sensitive. Her career is distinguished by her long history as an exhibiting painter, by her support of the work by other artists, and by her position in the community.  — Chris Ashley, June 2005    The following interview with Chris […]

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Interview with Alan Ebnother, by Chris Ashley

  The following conversation between Alan Ebnother and Chris Ashley was conducted via email during April 17 – May 4, 2005. For further information about Chris Ashley, please visit www.chrisashley.net.   Chris Ashley: Your biography states that in 1975 you “began to recognize painting.” You were then in your early twenties and involved in the dance world. What does this mean, to “recognize painting,” and when and how did you actually begin painting?   Alan […]

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David Reed: The Painter and Late Style, by Michael Brennan

David Reed is a grandmaster — no painter has contributed as much in terms of expanding the vocabulary of abstract painting and maintaining its relevance during this era of marginalization, although there are many in New York who currently enjoy greater status. With a rare combination of technical virtuosity, historical ambition, and genuine image innovation Reed’s work is advancing in a world that’s dissolving into total digital delusion. No other post-modern painter has developed an […]

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Johanna Pousette-Dart at Charles Cowles Gallery, by Michael Brennan

How do two planes meet? Forget Henny Youngman for a second, this is the kind of question that painters often worry over. Granted it’s an issue that most people today are oblivious to, especially masons, judging from the snaggletooth brick face one sees on any new building. This subject of planes-the transition of form within painting-has been given great and careful consideration by the painter Joanna Pousette-Dart. This was Pousette-Dart’s first solo show in nearly […]

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