Jump & Flow: An Interview with Gilbert Hsiao, by Brent Hallard, Visual Discrepancies blog, May 5, 2012

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"I was aware of op as a historical movement of course; I was an art history major at Columbia before deciding to move into fine art. And op is one of the most distinguishable styles out there."

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Georges Braque: Pioneer of Modernism, Acquavella, New York, NY

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Acquavella Galleries is pleased to announce Georges Braque: Pioneer of Modernism, a retrospective of seminal paintings curated by Dieter Buchhart. The exhibition will include over forty major paintings and papiers collés by the artist, all on loan from prestigious international public and private collections.

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Elizabeth Murray: Painting in the ’70s, The Pace Gallery, New York, NY

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Elizabeth Murray, Möbius Band, 1974 Oil on canvas, 14 x 28 inches (35.6 cm x 71.1 cm) Collection of Ellen Phelan and Joel Shapiro March 31 – April 30, 2011 The Pace Gallery is pleased to present its eighth exhibition devoted to the work of Elizabeth Murray and the gallery’s first exhibition since Murray’s death in 2007. Elizabeth Murray: Painting in the ‘70s will feature thirty oil on canvas paintings created between 1970 and 1980, including […]

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Arshile Gorky: A Retrospective, Philadelphia Museum of Art, Philadelphia, PA

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Arshile Gorky, Agony, c. 1947 October 21, 2009 – January 10, 2010 The Philadelphia Museum of Art will present a major traveling retrospective celebrating the extraordinary life and work of Arshile Gorky (American, born Armenia, c.1904-1948), a seminal figure in the movement towards gestural abstraction that would transform American art in the years after World War II. The first comprehensive survey of the work of this artist in nearly three decades, Arshile Gorky: A Retrospective […]

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Edward Shalala: Photographs of Paintings, The Painting Center, New York, NY

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  May 26 – June 20, 2009 Edward Shalala will exhibit documentary photographs in The Painting Center’s Project Room. Shalala makes temporary raw canvas thread paintings in NYC parks and grasslands and photographs the results. Shalala responds to the history of modern and postmodern abstraction that deals with ‘end game’ painting. The lineage begins with: Cezanne’s use of raw canvas (“in-reserve”), Barnett Newman’s painting ‘Name II,’1950, Robert Rauschenberg’s White painting series, 1951, Piero Manzoni’s clay […]

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Linda Francis: Interference

Installation view of Linda Francis: Interference, MINUS SPACE project space, Brooklyn, NY, 2009

February 2009

MINUS SPACE is pleased to present an exhibition of new work by New York artist Linda Francis. Francis will show a single painting conceived in three parts for the project space.

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Giorgio Morandi: 1890-1964, Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, NY

  Giorgio Morandi, Still Life (Natura morta), 1956 Oil on canvas; 9 7/8 x 13 7/8 inches September 16 — December 14, 2008 This is a comprehensive survey—the first in this country—of the career of Giorgio Morandi, one of the greatest 20th-century masters of still-life and landscape painting in the tradition of Chardin and Cézanne. The exhibition presents approximately 110 paintings, watercolors, drawings, and etchings from his early “metaphysical” works to his late evanescent still […]

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David Reed: The Painter and Late Style, by Michael Brennan

David Reed is a grandmaster — no painter has contributed as much in terms of expanding the vocabulary of abstract painting and maintaining its relevance during this era of marginalization, although there are many in New York who currently enjoy greater status. With a rare combination of technical virtuosity, historical ambition, and genuine image innovation Reed’s work is advancing in a world that’s dissolving into total digital delusion. No other post-modern painter has developed an […]

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Jake Berthot at McKee Gallery, by Michael Brennan

Cezanne baseballs. Who are these for? The thought crossed my mind while handling some regulation baseballs that were imprinted with images Cezanne’s bathers and his wife Hortense. They were for sale, along with the usual sundries, at the tail end of the exhaustive retrospective in Philadelphia eight years ago. Although absurd, I concluded that these baseballs were somehow an appropriately American cultural response. How else might our culture make use of Cezanne, whose work is […]

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