David Rhodes: Nocturnes, Some Walls, Oakland, CA

David Rhodes, Some Walls

Some Walls is pleased to present David Rhodes: "Nocturnes," paintings on linen and paper by the British-born, Berlin-based artist from January 19 - March 31, 2013. This is a unique opportunity to see Rhodes's work in the San Francisco Bay Area.

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David Reed: Heart of Glass, Kunstmuseum Bonn, Bonn, Germany

David Reed

David Reed, born 1946 in San Diego and a resident of New York since the 1970s, has in his good forty creative years developed an oeuvre that, with all its concentration on specific forms of painting, also maintains relationships to other, more recent image media, especially to film and video art.

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Jump & Flow: An Interview with Gilbert Hsiao, by Brent Hallard, Visual Discrepancies blog, May 5, 2012

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"I was aware of op as a historical movement of course; I was an art history major at Columbia before deciding to move into fine art. And op is one of the most distinguishable styles out there."

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70 Years of Abstract Painting – Excerpts, Jason McCoy Gallery, New York, NY

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Russell Roberts, I Want That Information, 2004 Oil on linen 22 x 18 inches (55.9 x 45.7 cm) April 6 – May 20, 2011 Jason McCoy Gallery is pleased to present 70 Years of Abstract Painting – Excerpts, which brings together an eclectic group of artists, including: Josef Albers, Richard Anuszkiewicz, Peggy Bates, Norman Bluhm, Giorgio Cavallon, Cora Cohen, Gene Davis, Fridel Dzubas, Joe Fyfe, James Gahagan, Al Held, Maxwell Hendler, Hans Hofmann, Sharon Horvath, Terrell James, Paul Kelpe, […]

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Tony Smith: Drawings, The Menil Collection, Houston, TX

menil-smith

Tony Smith, Untitled, 1954 Charcoal on paper Courtesy of the Tony Smith Estate, New York Photograph by Cathy Carver December 17, 2010 – April 3, 2011 “Tony Smith: Drawings” is a selection of rarely exhibited and early drawings by American artist Tony Smith (1912-1980). The work, executed within a limited time-period in the 1950’s, precedes Smith’s emergence as one of the most important sculptors of the mid-twentieth-century, following his career as an architectural designer. Some […]

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Becoming Modern in America: Life Magazine 1936-1972 & New Paintings by Loren Munk

Detail of Life Magazine, August 8, 1949

December 11, 2010 - January 29, 2011

MINUS SPACE is pleased to announce the exhibition Becoming Modern in America. The twofold exhibition will feature more than 20 vintage issues of Life magazine spanning the years 1936-1972, as well as two recent paintings by Brooklyn, New York-based painter Loren Munk.

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Tony Smith: Bronze, Matthew Marks Gallery, New York, NY

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Tony Smith, Trap, 1968 Cast bronze, black patina 10 x 55 x 55 inches November 6 – December 23, 2010 Matthew Marks is pleased to announce Tony Smith: Bronze, the next exhibition in his gallery at 523 West 24th Street. Smith executed the nine sculptures included in this exhibition between 1960 and 1970. This selection of his works in bronze, all of them finished in his signature black patina, provides a comprehensive view of his […]

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Adolph Gottlieb: A Retrospective, Peggy Guggenheim Collection, Venice, Italy

peggyguggenheim-gottlieb

Adolph Gottlieb, Burst 1973, 1973 Acrylic and enamel on canvas 213.4 x 152.4 cm Collection Adolph and Esther Gottlieb Foundation, NY September 4, 2010 – January 9, 2011 From September 4 to January 9, 2011 the Peggy Guggenheim Collection presents Adolph Gottlieb. A Retrospective, the first retrospective exhibition of this great American Abstract Expressionist painter to be shown in Italy. Like those previously dedicated to William Baziotes and Richard Pousette-Dart at the Peggy Guggenheim Collection, […]

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Arshile Gorky: A Retrospective, Philadelphia Museum of Art, Philadelphia, PA

philadelphia-gorky

Arshile Gorky, Agony, c. 1947 October 21, 2009 – January 10, 2010 The Philadelphia Museum of Art will present a major traveling retrospective celebrating the extraordinary life and work of Arshile Gorky (American, born Armenia, c.1904-1948), a seminal figure in the movement towards gestural abstraction that would transform American art in the years after World War II. The first comprehensive survey of the work of this artist in nearly three decades, Arshile Gorky: A Retrospective […]

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Max Gimblett: Parade – The Presence of Beauty, Hamish Morrison Gallery, Berlin, Germany

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Max Gimblett, Orpheus, 2004 Gesso, polyurethane, pencil, epoxy, pigment, moon gold leaf on wood panel 70 x 70 inches June 19 – August 1, 2009 Hamish Morrison Gallery presents, for the first time in Germany, New Zealand artist Max Gimblett (* 1935). His work enjoys special recognition in his home country with which he has retained many links, but especially in the United States where he has lived since the 1970s. This year his works […]

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Inside Abstraction, Galeria Janet Kurnatowski, Brooklyn, NY

janetkurnatowski-abstraction

  Installation view June 5 – July 12, 2009 Janet Kurnatowski Gallery presents Inside Abstraction, an exhibition that brings together ten exciting artists for the first time: Srule Brachman, Brice Brown, David Cummings, Scooter Flaherty, Sam Fryer, Chris Martin, Gelah Penn, Michal Shapiro, Evelyn Twitchell and Kim Uchiyama. Curated by Vered Lieb; some of the visual artists showcased have shown extensively while others are new and emergent artists. All of the artists in this show […]

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Tranquil Power: The Art of Perle Fine, Hofstra University Museum, Hempstead, NY

hofstramuseum-fine

  Pearl Fine, Unequivocably Blue, 1967 April 7 – June 26, 2009 Perle Fine (1905-1988) was one of the few women artists in the inner circle of the Abstract Expressionism movement. She moved from Boston to New York in the late 1920s to study art. Kimon Nicolaides was her mentor at The Art Students League. By the late 1930s, she attended Hans Hofmann’s studio sessions. Fine soon became an active member of the New York […]

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The Boom Is Over. Long Live the Art!, by Holland Cotter, The New York Times, February 15, 2009

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    Meredith Monk performing her piece “Juice” at the Guggenheim Museum in 1969, Estate of Peter Moore/VAGA, Courtesy of the Paula Cooper Gallery “…It’s day-job time again in America, and that’s O.K. Artists have always had them — van Gogh the preacher, Pollock the busboy, Henry Darger the janitor — and will again. The trick is to try to make them an energy source, not a chore. At the same time, if the example of past crises holds […]

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Hans Hofmann: Circa 1950, Rose Art Museum, Brandeis University, Waltham, MA

roseartmuseum-hofmann

  Photo by Kay Bell Reynal Several works by legendary American abstract expressionist painter Hans Hofmann (1880-1966), never shown in a U.S. museum before, will debut this winter at The Rose Art Museum. An extraordinary body of work created by Hans Hofmann for the architect Josep Sert’s 1950 city plan called the Chimbote Project is the genesis for this exhibition.  The nine painting studies Hofmann produced for a series of murals in this Peruvian city form […]

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Max Gimblett: The Midnight Sun, Haines Gallery, San Francisco, CA

hainesgallery-gimblett3

  Max Gimblett, Figure of Eight, 1999 15 inch quatrefoil January 8 – February 28, 2009 Max Gimblett’s ninth solo exhibition, The Midnight Sun, at Haines Gallery includes recent paintings of the visual and intellectual cross-cultural complexity that has been the hallmark of his work for decades. In the new double squares and quatrefoils, Gimblett uses patinas of epoxy and polyurethane, layers of gesso, acrylic and vinyl polymers, and surfaces of black and white and iridescent silver and gold, united by […]

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Paul Feeley: Nine Paintings, Matthew Marks Gallery (523 West 24th), New York, NY

    Paul Feeley: Corfu (February 22), 1962  Oil-based enamel on canvas, 60 x 48 inches  September 13 — October 25, 2008 The exhibition includes nine enamel on canvas paintings made between 1961 and 1964. Feeley’s abstract works with their bright colors, simple repetitive forms and symmetrical compositions occupy an important place in the history of twentieth-century American art. Feeley, alongside Morris Louis and Kenneth Noland, worked against the grain of the prevailing Abstract Expressionists […]

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Action/Abstraction: Pollock, de Kooning, and American Art, 1940-1976, The Jewish Museum, New York, NY

  May 4 — September 21, 2008 In Action/Abstraction: Pollock, de Kooning, and American Art, 1940-1976, the first major U.S. exhibition in 20 years to rethink Abstract Expressionism and the movements that followed, over fifty key works by 32 artists – among them Jackson Pollock, Willem de Kooning, Helen Frankenthaler, Mark Rothko – will be viewed from the perspectives of influential, rival art critics Clement Greenberg and Harold Rosenberg, the artists, and popular culture.

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Small Differences Make All the Difference, by Lynne Harlow

In his series of lectures, Pictures of Nothing: Abstract Art since Pollock, Kirk Varnedoe asks tough questions.  Why abstract art?  What is abstract art good for?  These questions, the topic of his six lectures, are familiar.  It seems to me that they are asked, and in a sense answered, every time an artist makes an abstract work.  They are the questions that artists ask as we wrestle with the history of abstraction and as we […]

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Ward Jackson: Heat at the Edges, A Conversation with Julian Jackson & Matthew Deleget

Ward Jackson at Kay-Mar Gallery, NY, 1964 Transit & Garden 1 (left to right)   Quite simply, you have to know about Ward Jackson and his work — he was an innovative abstract painter, a maverick editor and arts worker, and a key member of New York City’s abstract artist community.  I recently had the pleasure of speaking with Ward’s nephew, artist Julian Jackson, about his uncle’s life and work.  Our discussion that follows is […]

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Joseph Marioni at Peter Blum Gallery, by Michael Brennan

Although he has shown extensively in Europe for many years, it’s only in the past decade, when he began showing with Peter Blum, that his stature in America has grown large in a more public way. This, despite the fact that Marioni exhibited his work at Bykert Gallery in the 70’s, was tapped by Brice Marden for a show at Artists Space, and was included in a recent Whitney Biennial. However, it took the New […]

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