Ward Jackson: Black & White Diamonds 1960s

Installation view of Ward Jackson: Black & White Diamonds 1960s, MINUS SPACE, Brooklyn, NY, 2014

September 12 - October 25, 2014

MINUS SPACE is delighted to present the exhibition Ward Jackson: Black & White Diamonds 1960s. This is the late New York painter’s first exhibition with the gallery and the first to focus exclusively on his black and white paintings and drawings from the 1960s.

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Ward Jackson 1928-2004: A Survey of Five Decades, David Richard Contemporary, Santa Fe, NM

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Ward Jackson was born and grew up in Petersburg, Virginia. He studied painting at the Richmond Polytechnic Institute of the College of William and Mary, now Virginia Commonwealth University, earning his Master's Degree there in 1952. While still in school Jackson began the correspondence with Guggenheim curator Hilla Rebay that would eventually lead to his long tenure with that institution.

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The Museum of Non-Objective Painting: Hilla Rebay and the Origins of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, Guggenheim Museum, New York, 2009

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Click to purchase on Amazon.com By Tracey Bashkoff (Author), Don Quaintance (Author), John Hanhardt (Author), Karole Vail (Editor) Exploring the origins and early days of the Guggenheim Museum — when it was first known as the Museum of Non-Objective Painting — this volume reveals for the first time the Guggenheim’s complex architectural history, drawing on extensive correspondence between Founding Director Hilla Rebay and artist Rudolf Bauer (whose work the Guggenheim collected exhaustively) to reveal the […]

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Kandinsky, Guggenheim Museum, New York, NY

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Vasily Kandinsky, Several Circles (Einige Kreise), 1926 Oil on canvas, 55 1/4 x 55 3/8 inches Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York September 18, 2009 – January 13, 2010 Pioneer of abstract art and eminent aesthetic theorist, Vasily Kandinsky (b. 1866, Moscow; d. 1944, Neuilly-sur-Seine, France) broke new ground in painting in the first decades of the twentieth century. His seminal pre–World War I treatise Über das Geistige in der Kunst (On the Spiritual in […]

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Tranquil Power: The Art of Perle Fine, Hofstra University Museum, Hempstead, NY

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  Pearl Fine, Unequivocably Blue, 1967 April 7 – June 26, 2009 Perle Fine (1905-1988) was one of the few women artists in the inner circle of the Abstract Expressionism movement. She moved from Boston to New York in the late 1920s to study art. Kimon Nicolaides was her mentor at The Art Students League. By the late 1930s, she attended Hans Hofmann’s studio sessions. Fine soon became an active member of the New York […]

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Ward Jackson: Heat at the Edges, A Conversation with Julian Jackson & Matthew Deleget

Ward Jackson at Kay-Mar Gallery, NY, 1964 Transit & Garden 1 (left to right)   Quite simply, you have to know about Ward Jackson and his work — he was an innovative abstract painter, a maverick editor and arts worker, and a key member of New York City’s abstract artist community.  I recently had the pleasure of speaking with Ward’s nephew, artist Julian Jackson, about his uncle’s life and work.  Our discussion that follows is […]

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