Black Mountain College and its Legacy, Loretta Howard Gallery, New York, NY

black mountain - loretta howard

The exhibition features more than 100 works by 35 artists including Josef and Anni Albers, John Cage, Merce Cunningham, Willem and Elaine de Kooning, Buckminster Fuller, Jacob Lawrence, Robert Motherwell, Kenneth Noland, Robert Rauschenberg, Dorothea Rockburne, Kenneth Snelson, Jack Tworkov and Cy Twombly among others.

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Art=Text=Art: Works by Contemporary Artists, Joel and Lila Harnett Museum of Art, University of Richmond, Richmond, VA

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Art=Text=Art: Works by Contemporary Artists features 72 works created between 1960 and 2011, that include text or reference textual elements. Many of the works reflect developments in modern and contemporary art and critical theory, and relate to concurrent politics, history, and philosophy.

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Dorothea Rockburne: In My Mind’s Eye, Parrish Art Museum, Southampton, New York

dorothea rockburne

Dorothea Rockburne, Narcissus, 1985 Oil on gessoed linen 92 x 123 x 7 inches June 19 – August 14, 2011 Born and raised in Montreal, Rockburne first studied at the city’s École des Beaux-Arts with Paris-trained painters Paul-Émile Borduas and Jean-Paul Riopelle. Beginning in 1950, she attended the legendary Black Mountain College in Asheville, North Carolina, where classes with Merce Cunningham, John Cage, and, perhaps most significantly, the mathematician Max Dehn, had a seminal influence […]

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Malevich and the American Legacy, Gagosian Gallery, New York, NY

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Kazimir Malevich, Painterly Realism of a Football Player—Color Masses in the Fourth Dimension, 1915 Oil on canvas 26 x 17 inches March 2 – April 30, 2011 I have transformed myself into the zero of form and dragged myself out of the rubbish-filled pool of Academic Art. I have destroyed the ring of the horizon and escaped from the circle of things, from the horizon-ring which confines the artist and the forms of nature. –Kazimir […]

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Al Taylor: Wire Instruments and Pet Stains, Santa Monica Musuem of Art, Santa Monica, CA

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Al Taylor, Station of the Cross, 1990 Formica laminate and wire 42 x 25 x 23 inches January 21 – April 16, 2011 Al Taylor: Wire Instruments and Pet Stains is the first American survey of work by this important and prolific artist. The exhibition features two major series in Taylor’s vast oeuvre: Wire Instruments (1989-1990) and Pet Stains (1989-1992). These distinctive bodies of work will illustrate the importance of Taylor’s process and creative breadth. […]

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Kurt Schwitters: Color and Collage, The Menil Collection, Houston, TX

menil-schitters

Kurt Schwitters, Mz 371 bacco, 1922 Collage of cut and torn, printed, handwritten, tissue and coated papers on paperboard The Menil Collection October 22, 2010 – January 30, 2011 The German artist Kurt Schwitters (1887–1948) remains one of the most influential figures of the international avant-garde. In the years following the First World War he coined the term “Merz,” in reference to his ambition to “make connections …between everything in the world.” Hoping to unify […]

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The Minimalist Medici: Count Giuseppe Panza di Biumo, 1923-2010, by Ruth Ann Fredenthal, ArtCritical.com, June 18, 2010

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Installation view of Salotto – Villa Panza Museum, Varese, Italy (l to r) Ruth Ann Fredenthal, Untitled 130, 1987-1988 Multilayered oil on Oyster linen, 60 x 60 inches Ruth Ann Fredenthal, Untitled 121, 1984-1985 Multilayered oil on Oyster linen, 66 x 60 inches The Panza Collection (Photo: David Sotnik) Count Giuseppe Panza di Biumo, 1923-2010 “Most people who have any interest in Post-War American art, whether Abstract Expressionism, Pop Art, Minimalism, Environmental Art, Conceptualism or Monochromism […]

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Terry Winters at Matthew Marks Gallery, by Michael Brennan

Let’s begin by dropping some stock material. Abandoning, for a moment, dystopia, information theory, or recalling Piranesi’s prison etchings for the umpteenth time, along with metastasizing mutatis mutandis and all of the Popular Science pseudo-scientific (scientistic really) rhetoric that sticks so easily to the toothy surfaces of Terry Winters’ work. Winters is an important artist. His paintings have proven relevant because they reveal the often invisible operations of the wilder, real and artless avant-gardes informing […]

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