Conversations Between Elements and Space: Lynne Harlow, by Leah Constantine

Lynne Harlow, Against the Velvet of the Long Goodbye, 2013, Site-specific performance installation, White vinyl rain curtain, colored floodlights, electric guitar, guitar stand, amp, Dimensions variable, #LH35, Installation view at MINUS SPACE,  2013

Lynne Harlow, Against the Velvet of the Long Goodbye, 2013
Site-specific performance installation,
White vinyl rain curtain, colored floodlights,
electric guitar, guitar stand, amp
Dimensions variable
Installation view at MINUS SPACE, 2013

Conversations Between Elements and Space: Lynne Harlow
by Leah Constantine
Adhoc
July 2, 2015

Lynne Harlow‘s works exist only when a space exists. Her works expand on the physical architecture of the space they are in, defining both the negative and positive. The creative process of reduction challenges Harlow to ask “How little is enough?” Instead of an unnecessary addition of objects, Harlow allows for the audience to become more informed of their environment through communicating and challenging them to give the space meaning through personal engagement and interactions. Her work is made up of physically dependent materials such as light, fabric, vinyl, and paint that exist only for that moment of exhibition. Due to the temporal nature of each creation, Harlow relies on the sharing of information through documentation such as photography, video, and viewer communication from interactions with spaces.

Can you tell me a little bit about how you became involved in making art?

As a teen I was equally interested in making art and studying art history. They felt inseparable to me so I pursued both in college, graduating with a double major in art history and studio art. It wasn’t until later, while working at The Museum of Modern Art and studying at the Art Students League, that I chose to prioritize making and allow my interest in art history to support and guide me.

That’s amazing to have that opportunity at the Art Students League. Can you share with me a little bit about your experience and what you took away from the artists who instructed you?

The Art Students League has such a fascinating history and it continues to be a fantastic resource for artists in New York. I had studied printmaking in college and was interested in continuing to make lithographs but needed to find access to a print facilities. The ASL has a great litho studio and is quite close to MoMA, where I was working at the time. Michael Pellettieri, the printmaking instructor, ran the lithography and etching classes as open studio time and would work with each of us individually on whatever technical concerns we were facing. I had a lot of freedom to work and experiment there.

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