Dannielle Tegeder: Arrangements to Ward off Accidents with The Library of Abstract Sound, Priska C. Juschka Fine Art, New York, NY

 

priskacjuschka-tegeder

Installation view

May 21 – July 3, 2009

Priska C. Juschka Fine Art announces Arrangements to Ward Off Accidents, Dannielle Tegeder’s third solo show with the gallery. With this exhibition, Tegeder investigates, based upon her nonrepresentational repertoire, the influences of 20th century Modernism upon a 21st century artistic discourse that recalls original elements while elaborating further upon both ideas and techniques.

Formally inspired by two masters of abstract Modernism, Wassily Kandinsky and Kazimir Malevich, Tegeder creates The Library of Abstract Sound with 130 framed drawings in a shelved room, alluring the viewer to partake in the experience. Upon entering, the audience finds itself in a modernist ante chamber, encouraged to have a vis-à-vis dialogue with individual works as well as with the concept of the installation. Congruous with Russian composer Alexander Scriabin’s attempt to match sound and color, Tegeder presents us with a carefully choreographed ‘sound guide’ for each drawing, transcribed by a computer program that reads the lines and forms of their compositions. These musical readings, simultaneously displayed on a flat-screen monitor, representing each work, visualize and suggest a connection between the two mediums, art and music, and their relevance in a modernist discourse that reaches beyond the 20th century.

Upon leaving the constructed space of the installation, Tegeder leads us into a second space with conceptual drawings, more complex than the aesthetically minimal works of The Library of Abstract Sound. Here, analogous to her previous work, she ascribes to an eclectic vocabulary that borrows from modernist sources while contextualizing them anew. From Kandinksy’s seminal essay, Concerning the Spiritual in Art (1911), attributing his own synesthetic inspirations to classical music, to composer Arnold Schoenberg’s musically inspired paintings, to Malevich’s collaboration with Mikhail Matiushin, their cubo-futurist opera Victory Over the Sun (1913), with discordant music by Matiushin and libretto by Velimir Khlebnikov, exploring transrational language — a lineage of modernist reference points prevails. Serving as abstract metaphors in Tegeder’s work, they form a bow and create a trajectory between a historical era and an uncertain aesthetical future while encompassing an idiosyncratic moment in the present.

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