The Legacy of Agnes Martin: A Collection of Thoughts by Artists

  Agnes Martin, by Steve Karlik I went for a walk yesterday; a thin veil of snow cloaked the sidewalk.  At once, grids became apparent.  The accumulation of packed snow in the concrete’s seams made opaque grids, grids that were again defined by planes of less dense, more transparent layers of snow that covered the higher surfaces.  The combination of these lines and planes brought me back to painting and why painting has significance for […]

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Interview with Linda Francis, by Matthew Deleget

The following interview was published on MINUS SPACE in December 2004 in conjunction with Linda Francis’ spotlight exhibition.   Matthew Deleget: I would like to begin our interview with a brief discussion of your background. You were born and raised in New York City (The Bronx). What was you first contact with the arts? Was visual art something that was understood and supported?   Linda Francis: At the time, one could get a decent education […]

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David Reed: The Painter and Late Style, by Michael Brennan

David Reed is a grandmaster — no painter has contributed as much in terms of expanding the vocabulary of abstract painting and maintaining its relevance during this era of marginalization, although there are many in New York who currently enjoy greater status. With a rare combination of technical virtuosity, historical ambition, and genuine image innovation Reed’s work is advancing in a world that’s dissolving into total digital delusion. No other post-modern painter has developed an […]

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Jaq Chartier: Sun Tests at Schroeder Romero, by Nick Stillman

From Jan van Eyck’s innovations with linseed oil to Robert Smithson’s landscape interventions to Matthew Barney’s fictional universe of mythical, genetically mutated weirdos, the concept of the artist/scientist is one with art-historical legs. That said, all art making could be considered a type of experimental science—a process of trial and error usually resulting in an end product with kinks effectively massaged. Not so with Jaq Chartier’s Sun Tests. Chartier works for Golden Artist Colors testing […]

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Interview with Kevin Finklea, by Matthew Deleget

The following interview was published on MINUS SPACE in October 2004 in conjunction with Kevin Finklea’s spotlight exhibition.   Matthew Deleget: Let’s begin by talking about color, the central concern of your paintings over the past decade. You’ve worked in a pharmacy for over 20 years now, which you acknowledge has greatly affected your color sensibility. In fact, every time I see a television commercial for the acid reflux medicine, Prevacid, I think of your […]

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Tony Smith at Matthew Marks Gallery, Anish Kapoor at Barbara Gladstone Gallery, by Michael Brennan

If only everything were so black and white. The Tony Smith show at Matthew Marks was essentially all black, while the Anish Kapoor show next door at Barbara Gladstone, which was entitled “Whiteout”, was whiter than a teenage divas’ wedding cake. Both shows included heavyweight works by two sculptors mainly preoccupied with the matrimony of the material to the immaterial. Although the artists are generations apart (Smith died in 1980 at age 68 and Kapoor […]

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Johanna Pousette-Dart at Charles Cowles Gallery, by Michael Brennan

How do two planes meet? Forget Henny Youngman for a second, this is the kind of question that painters often worry over. Granted it’s an issue that most people today are oblivious to, especially masons, judging from the snaggletooth brick face one sees on any new building. This subject of planes-the transition of form within painting-has been given great and careful consideration by the painter Joanna Pousette-Dart. This was Pousette-Dart’s first solo show in nearly […]

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Open House: Working in Brooklyn at the Brooklyn Museum, by Nick Stillman

Early critical returns on the Brooklyn Museum’s Open House: Working in Brooklyn have been middling to scathing, with most negative reviews questioning the everything-but-the-kitchen-sink curatorial strategy. Open House is gleefully and maybe willfully disorganized, reflecting the vast ethnic, social, economic, and artistic diversity of the borough. But (and I’m not the first to say it) by positioning the show as the ultimate exercise in inclusiveness, curators Charlotta Kotik and Tumelo Mosaka weatherproof it from critical […]

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McKendree Key, Half Spaces: 207 Franklin Street #1, by Nick Stillman

The initial intention of Minimalism, as outlined by a young Donald Judd in his early essays, was not only to take art off the walls, but also to completely alter the viewer’s perception of it. Minimalism began as a type of body art, in the sense that you’re forced into a physical experience that disrupts if not eclipses the aesthetic one. Then the aesthetic experience is further muddled (or undermined) by the Minimalist insistence on […]

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Interview with Laura Sue Phillips, by Matthew Deleget

The following interview was published on MINUS SPACE in May 2004 in conjunction with Laura Sue Phillip’s spotlight exhibition.   Matthew Deleget: Let’s start at the beginning of your career. You grew up in California and did your undergraduate work at the California College of the Arts in San Francisco. A few years later, in the early 1990s, you earned your MFA at Hunter College in New York. What kind of work were you making […]

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Interview with Richard Bottwin, by Rossana Martinez

The following interview was published on MINUS SPACE in March 2004 in conjunction with Richard Bottwin’s spotlight exhibition.   Rossana Martinez: I would like to start our interview at the beginning of your career. You came of age as an artist during the early 1970s in and around New York City. What kind of work were you making at that time? Were there any specific artists, exhibitions, or events that had a profound impact on […]

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Jake Berthot at McKee Gallery, by Michael Brennan

Cezanne baseballs. Who are these for? The thought crossed my mind while handling some regulation baseballs that were imprinted with images Cezanne’s bathers and his wife Hortense. They were for sale, along with the usual sundries, at the tail end of the exhaustive retrospective in Philadelphia eight years ago. Although absurd, I concluded that these baseballs were somehow an appropriately American cultural response. How else might our culture make use of Cezanne, whose work is […]

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Hartmut Böhm interview with Matthew Deleget

Hartmut Böhm, Quadratrelief 32, 1968 Plexiglas, 127 x 127 x 5.5 cm Peter C. Ruppert Collection Museum im Kultur-speicher, Würzburg, Germany The following interview was published on MINUS SPACE in February 2004 in conjunction with Hartmut Böhm’s spotlight exhibition. Matthew Deleget: I would like to begin our interview – your first published in English – with a brief discussion of the art climate in Germany directly following World War II. You were born in Kassel, […]

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Bibi Calderaro interviewed by Rossana Martinez

The following interview was published on MINUS SPACE in December 2003 in conjunction with Bibi Calderaro’s spotlight exhibition.   Rossana Martinez: Faith, fertility, atoms, soul, and emptiness are some of the things you mention in your statement. I am curious to know what faith means to you in your work? What does fertility mean in your work?   Bibi Calderaro: The idea that forms carry an inner balance, strength, and the potential for provoking thoughts […]

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